IT Crisis in India: 56,000 Layoffs and Counting

cubicles-in-empty-office_svhoiim8__F0000

For Indian techies, 2017 was the stuff of nightmares.

One of the top employment generators until a few years ago, India’s $160 billion IT industry laid off more than 56,000 employees this year. Some analysts believe this spree was worse than the one during the 2008 financial crisis. Meanwhile, hiring plummeted, with entry-level openings having more than halved in 2017, according to experts.

More…

Advertisements

Office 365 Discontinuing Support for TLS 1.0 – Mar. 1, 2018

office365-logo-1

On March 1, 2018, Microsoft Office 365 will disable support for TLS 1.0 and 1.1. This means that, starting on March 1, 2018, all client-server and browser-server combinations must use TLS 1.2 or later protocol versions to be able to connect without issues to Office 365 services. This may require certain client-server and browser-server combinations to be updated.

This is going to directly affect anyone who has TLS 1.0 on in IE to interface with financial institutions that still use it (i.e. Trusteer) or web-based applications that also use it (i.e. Yardi). They’re going to have to use Firefox/Chrome to get to their email instead, is really all it is.

More…

Utility Spotlight: RegJump

If you’re anything like me, you absolutely cannot stand navigating through regedit. Thankfully, M$ via SysInternals came up with a little utility you can use in the CLI to jump directly to the key you’re looking for. Yes, it’s something you have to download, but even then it’s still faster than clicking your way through. Protip: Extract the .zip and then shift+right-click the file explorer window you’re in and select “open command prompt here” or type “cmd” in the address bar and hit enter to open a CLI where you’re at. Copy+paste in the path of the key and you’re good to go. That way, you don’t have to cd to wherever the utility is in order to run it.

Capture

Download RegJump at: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/downloads/regjump

PSA: Win10 Feature Update v1709 Re-Enables “Fast Startup”

If you didn’t know, Windows 10 (by default) never truly shuts down your PC. Even on the “high performance” power plan, there is an additional setting somewhat hidden that makes it so that even when you you shut down your PC via the start menu or even the power button, it never truly shuts off. I can’t speak definitively to the effects on the components, but how would you like it if you never got any restful sleep? For the uninitiated, it’s just a checkbox. For those who are aware, if you installed the latest feature update, you’re going to need to go in and un-check it again. Why? Because M$ doesn’t want to hear your shit about boot times. Here’s how to get there:

1
Open up your power options. I’m not going to insult your intelligence by telling you how to get this far. Select the highlighted option above, and it will take you to…

2
…”System Settings”. Why they couldn’t call it that on the previous page is beyond me. The checkboxes are going to be grayed out so hit the highlighted link next to the UAC symbol, then un-check the fast startup box.

Out of all the things to force on end users, I’m baffled at why M$ chose this. There are about 11,000 other reasons boot times are slow and most of them are because the machine has not properly been restarted or shut down in forever. This is the equivalent of saying “my car sputters in 1st gear so I’m going to always stay in 2nd”. It’s dumb. Give your PC a break and clear the box, man.